IPPC

The European IPPC Bureau

IPTS logoIpts
EUROPA > European Commission > JRC > IPTS > SPC > EIPPCB

Large Combustion Plants

This BREF deals with combustion installations with a rated thermal input exceeding 50 MW. Plants with a thermal input lower than 50 MW are, however, discussed where technically relevant because smaller units can potentially be added to a plant to build one larger installation exceeding 50 MW.

All kinds of conventional power plants (e.g. utility boiler plants, combined heat and power plants, district heating plants) used for mechanical power and heat generation are covered in this work. Industrial combustion installations are covered if they use conventional fuel. The commercial availability of the fuel on the market has been used as an indicator to identify conventional fuels. The criterion for classifying a fuel as a 'conventional fuel' is a known composition which remains relatively constant, and indeed is usually standardised. Coal, lignite, biomass, peat, liquid and gaseous fuels (including hydrogen and biogas) are regarded as conventional fuels. The use of waste as a secondary fuel is also covered in this work.

Large Combustion Plants

 

Due to the provisions of Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Community institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data, personal contact details of Technical Working Group members have been removed from this website.

 

The mission of the JRC is to provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of EU policies. As a service of the European Commission, the JRC functions as a reference centre of science and technology for the Union. Close to the policy-making process, it serves the common interest of the Member States, while being independent of special interests, whether private or national.